AWS CWI Questions and Answers (Module 6)

The free pdf file of Twenty (20) Module 7 Q&A model of 2000 version:

Module 7 AWS CWI QUESTIONS ANSWERS (pdf) DOWNLOAD

The Below – Twenty-four (24) Questions are model of 2018 version

Module 6: Welding Heat Treatment and Processes parameter

Q6-1 As a metal is heated:
a. energy is added to the structure.
b. the atoms move farther apart.
c. the atoms vibrate more vigorously.
d. the metal expands.
e. all of the above

Q6-2 The state of matter which exhibits the least amount of energy is:
a. solid
b. liquid
c. gas
d. quasi-liquid
e. none of the above

Q6-3 A problem occurring in weldments caused by the nonuniform heating produced by the welding operation is:
a. porosity
b. incomplete fusion
c. distortion
d. slag inclusions
e. none of the above –

Q6-4 All but which of the following will result in the elimination or reduction of residual stresses?
a. vibratory stress relief
b. external restraint
c. thermal stress relief
d. peening
e. postweld heat treatment

Q6-5 Steel exists in which of the following crystal arrangements?
a. HCP
b. FCC
c. BCC
d. a and b above
e. b and c above

Q6-6 Rapid cooling of a steel from the austenitic range results in a hard, brittle structure known as:
a. pearlite
b. carbide
c. cementite
d. bainite
e. martensite

Q6-7 Very slow cooling of steel may result in the production of a soft, ductile micro structure which has a lamellar appearance when viewed under high magnification. This structure is referred to as:
a. martensite
b. pearlite
c. bainite
d. ferrite
e. cementite

Q6-8 When rapid cooling produces a martensitic structure, what non-austenitizing heat treatment may be applied to improve the ductility of the steel?
a. quenching
b. tempering
c. annealing
d. normalizing
e. none of the above

Q6-9 The use of preheat will tend to:
a. result in a wider heat affected zone
b. produce a lower heat affected zone hardness
c. slow down the cooling rate
d. reduce the tendency of producing martensite in the heat affected zone
e. all of the above

Q6-10 Which of the following changes will warrant the addition or increase in the required preheat?
a. decreased carbon equivalent
b. increased carbon equivalent
c. increased base metal thickness
d. a and c above
e. b and c above

Q6-11 What heat treatment is characterized by holding the part at the austenitizing temperature for some time and then slow cooling in the furnace?.
a. normalizing
b. quenching
c. annealing
d. tempering
e. stress relief

Q6-12 What heat treatment is characterized by holding the part at the austenitizing temperature for some time and then slow cooling in still air?
a. normalizing
b. quenching
c. annealing
d. tempering
e. stress relief

Q6-13 Increasing the heat input:
a. decreases the cooling rate and increases the likelihood of cracking problems.
b. decreases the cooling rate and decreases the likelihood of cracking problems.
c. increases the cooling rate and increases the likelihood of cracking problems.
d. increases the cooling rate and decreases the likelihood of cracking problems.
e. none of the above

Q6-14 Increasing preheat:
a. decreases the cooling rate and increases the likelihood of cracking problems.
b. decreases the cooling rate and decreases the likelihood of cracking problems.
c. increases the cooling rate and increases the likelihood of cracking problems.
d. increases the cooling rate and decreases the likelihood of cracking problems.
e. none of the above

Q6-15 Increasing the carbon content:
a. decreases the likelihood of cracking problems.
b. increases the likelihood of cracking problems.
c. has nothing to do with the likelihood of cracking problems.
d. all of the above
e. none of the above

Q6-16 Which of the following generally follows quenching?
a. annealing
b. normalizing
c. quenching
d. tempering
e. stress relief

Q6-17 Which of the following can be accomplished using either thermal or mechanical techniques?
a. annealing
b. normalizing
c. quenching
d. tempering
e. stress relief

Q6-18 Which of the following results in the softest structure for steel?
a. annealing
b. normalizing
c. quenching
d. tempering
e. stress relief
Q6-19 For a steel having the following composition: 0.11 carbon, 0.65 manganese, 0.13 chromium, 0.19 nickel, 0:005 copper, and 0.07 molybdenum, what is its carbon equivalent using the following formula? CE = %C/6 + %Mn/15 + %Ni/5 + %Cr/14 + %Cu /4 + %Mo
a. 0.15
b. 0.23
c. 0.28
d. 0.31
e. 0.42

Q6-20 For a steel having the following composition: 0.16 carbon, 0.85 manganese, 0.25 chromium, 0.09 nickel, 0.055 copper, and 0.41 molybdenum, what is its carbon equivalent using the following formula? CE = %C/6 + %Mn/15 + %Ni/5 + %Cr/13 + % Cu/4 + %Mo
a. 0.23
b. 0.31
c. 0.34
d. 0. 41
e. 0.46

Questions Q6-21 through-Q6-24 refer to the Heat Input formula below:

Heat Input (J/in) = Amperage x Voltage x 60 Travel S peed (in/min).

Q6-21 The FCAW process is being utilized to weld a 1 inch thick structural steel member to a building column. The welding is being done with a 3/32 inch diameter self-shielded electrode with a 150° minimum preheat and interpass temperature. The welding parameters are adjusted to 30 volts, 250 amperes and 12 in/min. What is the heat input?
a. 375 J/in
b. 37,500 J/in
c. 375 kJ/m
d. a and b above
e. b and c above

Q6-22 GMAW (short circuiting) welds are produced at 18 volts, 100 amperes and 22 in/min. What is the heat input?
a. 238 J/in
b. 7333 J/in
c. 4909 J/in
d. 30 J/in
e. none of the above

Q6-23 The GMAW process is mechanized for welding 1/8″ thick stainless steel sheets against a copper backing bar. The process is operated at 300 amperes, 28 volts and 15 in/min. What is the resulting heat input?
a. 650 kJ/in
b. 650,000 J/in
c. 165,000 J/in
d. 16,500 J/in
e. none of the above

Q6-24 The GTAW process is being used for welding 1/16″ thick titanium using DCEN at 110 amperes, 15 volts and 6 in/min. What is the heat input?
a. 21 000 J/in
b. 21 kJ/in
c. 16,500 J/in
d. a and b above
e. b and c above

Key: eacbeebbeecabbbdeacebcec

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